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Highlights from NEWS 1130's live interview with Justin Trudeau

Last Updated Dec 21, 2016 at 6:48 am PDT

Summary

Trudeau says more funding for Metro Mayors Transportation Plan

Feds working on helping manage opioid crisis in BC

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joined us live on NEWS 1130 today.

He is in Vancouver to talk about a number of topics, including pipelines and the opioid crisis. Here are the highlights of our interview with him.

Listen to the full interview here:

Pipelines

Question: How do you intend to sell Lower Mainlanders on the benefits of recent pipeline approvals?

“I think Canadians, in particular, British Columbians, understand you cannot build a strong economy without protecting the environment. We’ve been doing that effectively here in BC for a very long time and the way to make sure our environment is protected is to put in place what we’ve done, a national price on carbon, move forward on an Oceans Protection Plan…put forward a pan-Canadian framework, demonstrate true leadership in reducing our carbon emissions across the country and at the same time, ensuring we have the jobs through this transition off fossil fuels. That’s what’s in the country’s interest, that’s what’s in BC’s interest.”

Question: Can you explain the reasoning behind imposing a ban on tanker traffic on the north coast but allowing more tankers to come into Vancouver ports?

“Vancouver harbour is already a very busy port with lots of jobs, lots of economic activity and we need do a better job of protecting it. That’s why just today I was making an announcement around two new tugs that the coast guard is going to have to protect not just the Lower Mainland area but up the coast as well. We’re demonstrating world-leading science on protecting the Southern Resident pod of Orcas. There’s a lot of things we need to do and fundamentally Canadians understand that there’s no choice to be made anymore between environment and economy. We need the jobs and we need to protect the environment for future generations.”

Opioid Crisis

Question: What more can we expect from the federal government to directly help this region?

“One thing we’ve been working very hard on is to reverse the decisions made by the previous government to set up harm reduction sites. We know that harm reduction is a big part of dealing with the immediate crisis, to support people who are in danger of overdosing, but there’s a lot more we have to do, whether it’s continuing to make restrictions on pill presses, whether it’s working with first repsonders and police to be able to be there and help better. On top of that, we have to look at the whole frame. The investments we are going to be making in a national housing strategy, the investments we want to make in mental health and dealing with addictions. These are things that are going to help us through this crisis and out the other side to a place of safety because it’s not just certain communities anymore that are vulnerable to the fentanyl and the opioid crisis.”

Transportation

Question: Will you commit your government to funding the second phase of the local mayors’ 10-year Transportation Plan in the next budget?

“Absolutely. One of the things that we’re looking forward to in the next budget is significant announcements on building new public transit. One of the things I’ve always said is it shouldn’t be up to Ottawa to decide what line is needed where and how this should actually be delivered. That’s why we’ve been creating such great partnerships with local municipalities including the City of Vancouver, across the Lower Mainland on what their priorities are.”

Softwood Lumber

Question: An interim duty could be around the corner on Canadian softwood imports, what does your government plan to do?

“We’ve been engaging regularly since I first took office. In my very first meeting with President Obama, we talked about softwood lumber and we’ve continued to engage throughout. The challenge is it’s the industry on the United States side that is slowing things down rather than the administration. But we continue to make representations, to work very hard. I’ve got a great team including Chrystia Freeland, our international trade minister who’s been working very closely with the American administration on this. We know it’s a difficult file, but it’s one that we’re working very seriously on.”

Donald Trump

Question: Any advice for Trump about leading a country?

“Stay focused on the mandate that got you elected. People give you their trust when they elect you.”