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  • Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Chris Alexander answers a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 17, 2014. A new battle is brewing between refugee advocates and the federal government ‚Äî this time over whether those awaiting a decision on their refugee status ought to have access to social assistance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

    Advocates prepare to battle anew with feds over cuts to refugee benefits

    Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press

    OTTAWA – A new battle is brewing between refugee advocates and the federal government — this time over whether those awaiting a decision on their refugee status ought to have access to social assistance. Measures that would give provinces the ability to cut off access were buried in the Conservatives’ latest omnibus budget bill, catching

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  • Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Chris Alexander answers a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 17, 2014. A new battle is brewing between refugee advocates and the federal government ‚Äî this time over whether those awaiting a decision on their refugee status ought to have access to social assistance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

    Advocates prepare to battle anew with feds over cuts to refugee benefits

    Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press

    OTTAWA – A new battle is brewing between refugee advocates and the federal government — this time over whether those awaiting a decision on their refugee status ought to have access to social assistance. Measures that would give provinces the ability to cut off access were buried in the Conservatives’ latest omnibus budget bill, catching

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  • TransCanada public relations documents on Energy East raise concerns

    Bob Weber, The Canadian Press

    TransCanada PipeLines acknowledges it considered aggressive tactics such as using proxy groups to attack opponents of the company’s proposed Energy East pipeline. But the Calgary-based pipeline company (TSX:TCA.PR.X) says it did not accept those recommendations outlined in leaked documents from the Edelman public relations firm obtained by Greenpeace. “Everything that Edelman put forward we’ve considered,”

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  • Saskatchewan farmer Robert Latimer is pictured in Ottawa on March 17, 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tom Hanson

    Parole board keeps travel ban outside of Canada on for Robert Latimer

    The Canadian Press

    SASKATOON – The Parole Board of Canada says a condition that bans Robert Latimer from leaving the country without permission will not be lifted. A Federal Court judge ruled in September that there is nothing to indicate the 60-year-old is a danger and should be prevented from freely travelling outside Canada. The judge ordered the

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  • Families of Calgary stabbing victims ask media to stand down on warrants

    The Canadian Press

    CALGARY – The families of five young people who were stabbed to death at a party celebrating the end of the school year are asking the media to stand down on its request to have information about the crime released to the public. Zackariah Rathwell, 21; Lawrence Hong, 27; Joshua Hunter, 23; Jordan Segura, 22;

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  • An ochre sea star with one leg disintegrating from star wasting syndrome is pictured on the Oregon Coast on May 16, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Oregon State University, Elizabeth Cherny-Chipman

    Mystery of sea-star deaths on Pacific north coast of North America solved

    The Canadian Press and Camille Bains, The Canadian Press

    VANCOUVER – Scientists have cracked the mystery of what has killed millions of sea stars in waters off the Pacific coast, from British Columbia to Mexico. Microbiology professor Ian Hewison of Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., says the culprit is densovirus, commonly found in invertebrates. He says the virus literally made sea stars dissolve within

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  • A Bohemian waxwing positions a mountain ash berry before swallowing on Dec. 18, 2013, in Anchorage, Alaska. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Anchorage Daily News, Erik Hill

    Yukon warns of boozing birds, flying drunk on fermented fruit

    The Canadian Press

    WHITEHORSE – Imbibing and then flying for some birds in the Yukon is proving to be a hazardous experience. Environment Yukon is warning that Bohemian waxwings in the territory have been gorging on fermented mountain ash berries, then attempting to fly off with less than successful results. Meghan Larivee (lah-REE’-vay), with Environment Yukon’s animal health

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  • University students want Edmonton to ban use of e-cigarettes in public places

    John Cotter, The Canadian Press

    EDMONTON – A group of graduate students in public health want Edmonton to follow the example of other communities that have banned the use of electronic cigarettes in public places. The University of Alberta students say the growing popularity of e-cigarettes could undermine years of effort aimed at getting people to quit using tobacco or

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  • A sign for the Canadian Security Intelligence Service building is shown in Ottawa, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

    Feds look for ways to make better use of secret intelligence in court

    The Canadian Press and Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press

    OTTAWA – A senior federal official says the government is looking for ways to better use secret intelligence in court proceedings as a means of countering homegrown terrorism. John Davies, a director general with Public Safety Canada, says the goal is to introduce intelligence in criminal trials while protecting the sensitivity of the information. Davies

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  • A quick look at 2011 Conservative election pledges aimed at families

    The Canadian Press

    OTTAWA – A look at tax-and-benefit measures aimed at families that were promised by the Conservatives in the 2011 election campaign, contingent on a balanced budget. Two 2011 Tory election promises that have already been announced: Income splitting: The Conservative government’s “Family Tax Cut” will allow an eligible taxpayer to transfer up to $50,000 of

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  • Canada silent as U.S. debates policy shift in Islamic State war strategy

    The Canadian Press and Murray Brewster, The Canadian Press

    OTTAWA – The Obama administration is under pressure to stretch the definition of what it means to “advise and assist” Iraqi and Kurdish forces in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Whether Canada would feel obliged to follow suit, however, remains a mystery. U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told CNN

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  • RCMP diver tells of unsuccessful search for missing fisherman at murder trial

    Aly Thomson, The Canadian Press

    PORT HAWKESBURY, N.S. – The trial of a man accused in the death of a fisherman from Cape Breton heard an RCMP diver explain Monday how police searched unsuccessfully for the body of Phillip Boudreau. Const. Tom McLeod, incident commander for the dive team, told the second-degree murder trial of Joseph James Landry that his

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  • A look at the conditions of roads running through reserves in New Brunswick

    The Canadian Press

    OTTAWA – New Brunswick dispatched officials to collect video footage and data on the condition of roads running through the province’s First Nations communities. Here is what they found: Paved roads Good condition: 12 per cent Fair condition: 27 per cent Poor condition: 59 per cent Unsurfaced roads Good condition: None Fair condition: 8 per

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  • Aboriginal Affairs Minsiter Bernard Valcourt responds to a question during Question Period in the House of Commons Tuesday June 17, 2014 in Ottawa. A new document says most roads running through First Nations communities in New Brunswick are in poor condition — and it would cost tens of millions of dollars to repair and maintain them. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

    Millions needed to repair roads in New Brunswick’s First Nation communities

    The Canadian Press

    OTTAWA – A new document says most roads running through First Nations communities in New Brunswick are in poor condition — and it would cost tens of millions of dollars to repair and maintain them. Earlier this year, provincial officials visited First Nations across New Brunswick to collect video footage and data about road conditions.

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